Beauty Tips Villa https://beautytipsvilla.com Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.5 Professor reveals motivation behind doctors deceiving patients into carrying their babies https://beautytipsvilla.com/professor-reveals-motivation-behind-doctors-deceiving-patients-into-carrying-their-babies/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=professor-reveals-motivation-behind-doctors-deceiving-patients-into-carrying-their-babies Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:35 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8201143/Professor-reveals-motivation-doctors-deceiving-patients-carrying-babies.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490  A professor who studies the ‘phenomenon’ of fertility doctors who deceive patients into carrying their babies has revealed the motivation behind the ‘gross’ act.  Jody Madeira, from Indiana, specialises in studying fertility fraud and believes there are at least 30 cases of doctors inseminating women with their sperm without their […]

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 A professor who studies the ‘phenomenon’ of fertility doctors who deceive patients into carrying their babies has revealed the motivation behind the ‘gross’ act. 

Jody Madeira, from Indiana, specialises in studying fertility fraud and believes there are at least 30 cases of doctors inseminating women with their sperm without their consent around the world, including Jan Karbaat in the Netherlands and Kim McMorries in America,

Speaking on BBC‘s The Immaculate Deception podcast, she said she had never heard a ‘convincing answer’ as to why doctors do it.

However, she said motivation can range from believing they are ‘helping patients’ by helping them become pregnant, to doctors who behave ‘like rapists’ and want to ‘insert themselves into other people’s lives.’  

Jody Madeira, from Indiana, spoke to BBC's The Immaculate Deception about the motivation behind fertility doctors whom inseminate women with their own sperm and impregnate them (pictured, Jan Karbaat, who is believed to have fathered at least 48 children)

Jody Madeira, from Indiana, spoke to BBC's The Immaculate Deception about the motivation behind fertility doctors whom inseminate women with their own sperm and impregnate them (pictured, Jan Karbaat, who is believed to have fathered at least 48 children)

Jody Madeira, from Indiana, spoke to BBC’s The Immaculate Deception about the motivation behind fertility doctors whom inseminate women with their own sperm and impregnate them (pictured, Jan Karbaat, who is believed to have fathered at least 48 children) 

Jody explained that there was often recurring characteristics in cases of fertility fraud and said that the practice occurs ‘all over the world’ including in the US, Canada, South Africa, Belgium, the UK and Germany. 

She said: ‘They tend to be white male doctors, practising in the ’70s and ’80s. They tend to be community leaders, religious figures. Doctor after doctor falls into this pattern.’

Jody said: ‘Nobody has actually asked these doctors why they did it and received a convincing answer.

‘Doctors say they do it to help desperate patients. But there are other ways to help desperate patients, and you can help by treating them in a respectable and ethical fashion.’

Kim McMorries used his own sperm to impregnate women in the 1980s, and still runs an obstetrics, gynecology and infertility clinic

Kim McMorries used his own sperm to impregnate women in the 1980s, and still runs an obstetrics, gynecology and infertility clinic

Kim McMorries used his own sperm to impregnate women in the 1980s, and still runs an obstetrics, gynecology and infertility clinic

She continued to say doctors may perform the act as a way to make their business look more successful, saying: ‘You have a business reason, and that’s easier than people are lazy or donors don’t show up.’

She went on: ‘Then there are darker reasons, the doctors believe they have great genetics and the world would be better if there were more of their children in it.

‘Or more narcissistic, not just an ego, a pathological condition.’

‘Or you have other reasons which are more akin to reasons why people rape… power, the desire to insert oneself in someone’s life in unorthodox ways.

Professor Jody revealed the motivation behind the act, revealing that some doctors do it as an act of power, while others may do it for 'business reasons' or they believe they're helping 'desperate patients

Professor Jody revealed the motivation behind the act, revealing that some doctors do it as an act of power, while others may do it for 'business reasons' or they believe they're helping 'desperate patients

Professor Jody revealed the motivation behind the act, revealing that some doctors do it as an act of power, while others may do it for ‘business reasons’ or they believe they’re helping ‘desperate patients 

She went on to discuss doctors such as Jan Karbareet in the Netherlands and Kim McMorries in America, who both inseminated women with their own sperm while working as fertility doctors.

She said: ‘I don’t think they hated women. I think they must have had a conception of women and men and fatherhood.

‘I think that they had a certain conception of their role as a medical provider. You cannot engaged in elicit insemination without believeing that the doctor knows best.

‘They did it to fulfill some deep seated psychological need. That’s when you turn to the darker reasons.’

Jody said she believes doctors have a variety of motivations as to why they might do it, but said she had never heard a convincing answer as to why they perform the act

Jody said she believes doctors have a variety of motivations as to why they might do it, but said she had never heard a convincing answer as to why they perform the act

Jody said she believes doctors have a variety of motivations as to why they might do it, but said she had never heard a convincing answer as to why they perform the act 

Discussing the case of Karbaat, she went on to say that the way he ran his business should have rang alarm bells for authorities because ‘it was indicative of a lot of problems.’

She said: ‘Authorities stepped in at an earlier point and took over the clinic because he wouldn’t stop practicing. 

‘There an inability to stop practicing, he had been told to retire, he was endangering his patients and he could not stop. He would not stop. He willfully didn’t stop.’

Jody explained that on learning about these cases, she has been left with a feeling of ‘physical revulsion.’

She said: ‘That feeling of physical disgust has remained with me for the duration of this project, its the idea of a doctor who does this.’ 

Who are the doctors committing fertility fraud?  

Jan Karbaat

Pictured: parents and donor children of Dr Karbaat reacting to news in February that they would be given the results of Karbaat's DNA test so they could conduct their own comparisons

Pictured: parents and donor children of Dr Karbaat reacting to news in February that they would be given the results of Karbaat's DNA test so they could conduct their own comparisons

Pictured: parents and donor children of Dr Karbaat reacting to news in February that they would be given the results of Karbaat’s DNA test so they could conduct their own comparisons

Jan Karbaat, who died in April 2017 aged 89, is feared to have fathered up to 200 children while working at the Karbaat’s Blijdorp medical centre in Barendrecht, south of Rotterdam.

It is believed over time he helped 6,000 women have over 10,000 children, and it remains unclear how many children are biologically his. 

The court case began in 2017 when 22 children born after their parents underwent treatment at the centre applied for legal help in resolving their true heritage. 

Defence for Children, an organisation representing parents and children born through his now-closed clinic, said DNA tests conducted in February 2019 confirmed 49 children in the case are direct descendants of Karbaat.

Before his death, aged 89, Karbaat reportedly admitted to having fathered about 60 children in his time at the discredited clinic which closed in 2009 amid reports of irregularities.

Karbaat later also admitted to mixing sperm from various donors and issuing fraudulent donor documentation, the Dutch daily newspaper NRC reported. 

Dr. Kim McMorries 

Eve Wiley, 31, was horrified when she discovered her family doctor Dr. Kim McMorries had used his own sperm to inseminate her mother in 1987

Eve Wiley, 31, was horrified when she discovered her family doctor Dr. Kim McMorries had used his own sperm to inseminate her mother in 1987

Eve Wiley, 31, was horrified when she discovered her family doctor Dr. Kim McMorries had used his own sperm to inseminate her mother in 1987

Eve Wiley, 31, spent years looking for her father after she learned she was conceived by artificial insemination in 1987. 

Fourteen years ago she traced her mother’s sperm donor Steve Scholl – known as Donor #106 – and over time they’ve built a loving father-daughter relationship. 

But that relationship was rocked when she took genetic history tests on 23andMe and Ancestry.com and learned that her true father was fertility doctor Dr. Kim McMorries.

McMorries had quietly mixed in his sperm with that of the donor after the donor sperm failed to impregnate Wiley’s mother Margo Williams after five tries.

Dr. Kim McMorries has publicly defended his actions and continues to run a fertility clinic

Dr. Kim McMorries has publicly defended his actions and continues to run a fertility clinic

Dr. Kim McMorries has publicly defended his actions and continues to run a fertility clinic 

He used his own sperm that he donated to a sperm bank from his medical school days – and succeeded in getting her pregnant.

Dr. McMorries has now defended his actions, claiming they were ‘acceptable practice for the times.’

‘I had no idea, 33 years ago, the importance of an offspring’s desire to know their biological identity. At that time, the anonymity was supposed to be permanent,’ he added.

In Texas, the act is not considered a crime as the state does not include rape by deception charges. 

Dr. McMorries still runs an obstetrics, gynecology and infertility clinic in Nacogdoches called the Women’s Center. Its website says the clinic offers ‘conservative values with personal health.’

Donald Cline

Donald Cline used his own sperm to artifically inseminate patients without consent throughout the 1970s and '80s

Donald Cline used his own sperm to artifically inseminate patients without consent throughout the 1970s and '80s

Donald Cline used his own sperm to artifically inseminate patients without consent throughout the 1970s and ’80s

Donald Cline, an Indiana fertility doctor, who used his own sperm to artificially inseminate dozens of patients without their consent is confirmed to be the father to at least 48 children born in the 1970s and 1980s.

The now-80-year-old has admitted to using his own sperm to inseminate at least 50 unwitting women.

Several of the children conceived as a result have bonded with their half-siblings over the startling discovery that they’re related

Cline was convicted of lying about the inseminations in December 2017.

 

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The morning shake packed with fruit and veggies that tastes like WHITE CHOCOLATE https://beautytipsvilla.com/the-morning-shake-packed-with-fruit-and-veggies-that-tastes-like-white-chocolate/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-morning-shake-packed-with-fruit-and-veggies-that-tastes-like-white-chocolate Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:31 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-8203899/The-morning-shake-packed-fruit-veggies-tastes-like-WHITE-CHOCOLATE.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Instagram users are going wild for a healthy smoothie that taste just like white chocolate. The recipe, which was first shared by British celebrity stylist Angie Smith on Instagram, is called the ‘fraud shake’ and is loved by Rochelle Humes, Frankie Bridge and Millie Mackintosh. The bright green drink is […]

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Instagram users are going wild for a healthy smoothie that taste just like white chocolate.

The recipe, which was first shared by British celebrity stylist Angie Smith on Instagram, is called the ‘fraud shake’ and is loved by Rochelle Humes, Frankie Bridge and Millie Mackintosh.

The bright green drink is made of spinach, peanut butter, honey, water, oat milk and mango and has been made and shared online by dozens of Instagram users who are getting creative in the kitchen amid the coronavirus lockdown.

Instagram users are going wild for a very healthy smoothie that taste just like white chocolate. The recipe, which was first shared by celebrity stylist Angie Smith (pictured), is called the 'fraud shake'

Instagram users are going wild for a very healthy smoothie that taste just like white chocolate. The recipe, which was first shared by celebrity stylist Angie Smith (pictured), is called the 'fraud shake'

The bright green drink is made of spinach, peanut butter, honey, water, oat milk and mango and has been made and shared online by hundreds of Instagram users who are getting creative in the kitchen amid the coronavirus lockdown

The bright green drink is made of spinach, peanut butter, honey, water, oat milk and mango and has been made and shared online by hundreds of Instagram users who are getting creative in the kitchen amid the coronavirus lockdown

Instagram users are going wild for a very healthy smoothie that taste just like white chocolate. The recipe, which was first shared by celebrity stylist Angie Smith (pictured left), is called the ‘fraud shake’ and is loved by Rochelle Humes, Vogue Williams and Millie Mackintosh (recipe right)

How to make the ‘fraud shake’

Ingredients

  • 100g of spinach
  • Three slices of mango
  • One tablespoon of peanut butter
  • One tea spoon of honey
  • 200ml of oat milk
  • 200ml of water

Method

  • Put all ingredients in a blender and blend 

TIP: If you don’t have oat milk, mix water and two tablespoons of oats  

Angie, who is living in Sydney and names Holly Willoughby and Davina McCall among her famous clients, added that you can pre-freeze the ingridients to make the shake at a later date.

Others making the smoothie put their own twist on the popular shake, with some adding protein powder, extra oats or honey. 

One fan is Rochelle Humes, who tried the drink with her daughter Alaia-Mai, six.

In a sweet clip shared on his Instagram story, the former Saturdays star, 31, said ‘Angie has promised this will taste like white chocolate, let’s try it’. 

Millie Mackintosh, who shared the recipe on her Instagram and said it is a favourite snack

Millie Mackintosh, who shared the recipe on her Instagram and said it is a favourite snack

Millie Mackintosh, who shared the recipe on her Instagram and said it is a favourite snack

One fan is Rochelle Humes, who tried the drink with her daughter Alaia-Mai, six. In a sweet clip shared on his Instagram story, the former Saturdays star, 31, said 'Angie has promised this will taste like white chocolate, let's try it'

One fan is Rochelle Humes, who tried the drink with her daughter Alaia-Mai, six. In a sweet clip shared on his Instagram story, the former Saturdays star, 31, said 'Angie has promised this will taste like white chocolate, let's try it'

Rochelle's former S Club Juniors and Saturdays bandmate Frankie Bridge  is also a fan. The mum-of-two shared a snap of her sipping the shake this morning.

Rochelle's former S Club Juniors and Saturdays bandmate Frankie Bridge  is also a fan. The mum-of-two shared a snap of her sipping the shake this morning.

One fan is Rochelle Humes (left) who tried the drink with her daughter Alaia-Mai, six.  Rochelle’s former S Club Juniors and Saturdays bandmate Frankie Bridge (right) is also a fan. The mum-of-two shared a snap of her sipping the shake this morning.

While she's currently taking Instagram by storm with her recipes, Angie is best known as a stylist. She is pictured left at an event last year

While she's currently taking Instagram by storm with her recipes, Angie is best known as a stylist. She is pictured left at an event last year

While she’s currently taking Instagram by storm with her recipes, Angie is best known as a stylist. She is pictured left at an event last year 

‘Sweet but spinachy’: FEMAIL’S verdict on the fraudshake

I have a freezer full of frozen fruit and veg which I buy and tell myself I’m going to use to make a healthy smoothie – but I can never quite emulate what I once bought from Joe & the Juice before coranavirus locked us all indoors. 

Hearing about a smoothie that taste like white chocolate instead of green mulch but was full of vitamins instead of sugar, I thought I’d give it a go and dusted off my nutribullet.

I already had a bag of spinach and mango smoothie mix and whacked it in with the rest of the ingredients. I have to substitute the peanut butter for almond butter and I was impressed with the result.

You can definitely tell it’s spinach-based, due to the bitty texture, but maybe that would change with a bit more blending. 

But the flavour was sweet, but not overpowering, and definitely tasted like something that  you’d pay a premium for in a trendy juice bar. Overall I’m pleased but I would make less next time, as Angie’s recipe made enough for two massive portions.

After blending all the ingredients together, both Rochelle and her daughter seemed impressed with the shake saying it did taste like white chocolate.

Other celebrity fans include Millie Mackintosh, who reshared the recipe on her Instagram.

Sharing a picture of her sipping on the shake, the mother-to-be wrote: ‘ I shared this smoothie recipe on my stories last week and I keep getting messages asking how to make it. 

‘I got inspired to make one after Angie Smith posted saying it tasted like white chocolate and it really does! 

‘I am now addicted, the below makes one big portion but I think it’s the perfect amount for two people. It’s my new favourite mid morning snack and Hugo is a big fan too. Have you tried it yet?

Angie also revealed you can freeze the ingredients and save them for a later date

Angie also revealed you can freeze the ingredients and save them for a later date

Others making the smoothie put their own twist on the popular shake, with some adding protein powder, extra oats or honey.

Others making the smoothie put their own twist on the popular shake, with some adding protein powder, extra oats or honey.

Angie also revealed you can freeze the ingredients and save them for later. Right, the smoothie

Hundreds of fans shared pictures of their creations of the white chocolate tasting shake

Hundreds of fans shared pictures of their creations of the white chocolate tasting shake

Hundreds of fans shared pictures of their creations of the white chocolate tasting shake

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TV’s Malory Towers is a riot of midnight feasts. But the reality was a mix of cruelty and cocktails https://beautytipsvilla.com/tvs-malory-towers-is-a-riot-of-midnight-feasts-but-the-reality-was-a-mix-of-cruelty-and-cocktails/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tvs-malory-towers-is-a-riot-of-midnight-feasts-but-the-reality-was-a-mix-of-cruelty-and-cocktails Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:28 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8206413/TVs-Malory-Towers-riot-midnight-feasts-reality-mix-cruelty-cocktails.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Midnight feasts, dormitory japes, the unbridled joy of a full tuck box. What could be more wholesome and fun than life at a girls’ boarding school, as depicted in the BBC‘s adaption of Malory Towers, which started this week? But does Enid Blyton’s classic really capture the essence of these […]

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Midnight feasts, dormitory japes, the unbridled joy of a full tuck box. What could be more wholesome and fun than life at a girls’ boarding school, as depicted in the BBC‘s adaption of Malory Towers, which started this week? But does Enid Blyton’s classic really capture the essence of these institutions? Here, our female writers recall the magic, misery and mayhem of their boarding school days…

Screenshot of the BBC's adaptation of Malory Towers, which started this week

Screenshot of the BBC's adaptation of Malory Towers, which started this week

Screenshot of the BBC’s adaptation of Malory Towers, which started this week

Tasks of Maoist pointlessness, and our diet was as restricted as our liberty 

Charlotte Moore, writer 

Nothing could have prepared me for lockdown better than the five years I spent at Badminton, an all-girls boarding school in Bristol, from 1970 to 1975. 

Confined with the same people for months on end, we were allowed out only for exercise. Our diet was as restricted as our liberty. 

We couldn’t go to the hairdresser, or to parties, cafes or cinemas. Shopping for ‘essential supplies’ – buns, Marvel milk powder, Jackie magazine – was a rare Saturday treat, chaperoned by a matron. We had no privacy, little money, but lots of time.  

The authorities occupied us with tasks of Maoist pointlessness, like making and remaking beds and polishing our shoes, whether we’d worn them or not. 

There was ‘No talking after lights out’, so we crept into each other’s beds to continue our conversations in whispers. 

By day, we huddled for warmth like monkeys, inking in each other’s freckles with a Biro. Sharing was enforced, which we resented; sweets sent from home were evenly distributed which could mean literally one sherbet pip on each teatime plate. 

CHARLOTTE MOORE (pictured): Nothing could have prepared me for lockdown better than the five years I spent at Badminton, an all-girls boarding school in Bristol, from 1970 to 1975

CHARLOTTE MOORE (pictured): Nothing could have prepared me for lockdown better than the five years I spent at Badminton, an all-girls boarding school in Bristol, from 1970 to 1975

CHARLOTTE MOORE (pictured): Nothing could have prepared me for lockdown better than the five years I spent at Badminton, an all-girls boarding school in Bristol, from 1970 to 1975

But we willingly shared jokes, confidences, gossip and moral support. Rules governed us down to our underwear: two pairs of knickers worn at all times, white ‘linings’ under ‘Navy blues’, but we could only change the whites twice and the blues once a week. Gentle reader, I’m afraid it’s true. Bending the rules was essential. 

We rinsed our knickers and slept on them to get them dry. As we got older, we climbed walls, jumped on buses, met boys. School work seemed uninteresting and unimportant. What mattered was friendship. Boarding school meant cold, boredom, hunger, subversion – and laughter. 

Even Reverend Mother was racist 

Libby Purves, broadcaster 

I had both extremes of boarding school life. The first was a year in Krugersdorp in the 1960s, when my Dad was posted to Apartheid-era South Africa. 

The Ursuline nuns had no idea how to be Christians, teachers, or indeed tolerable humans. Even Reverend Mother used racist language. 

Food was mealie-meal porridge, discipline was blows with a ruler and military drill, washing a jug of cold water. But back in England, four years of liberal, intellectual nuns at Beechwood Sacred Heart School in Tunbridge Wells was a relief. 

Holy, of course (you got woken up with a stoup of holy water and a blessing) and there was typically awful science teaching for girls at that period. But there were wild feast days , a n d terrifying candlelit story times on Halloween after bedtime. 

LIBBY PURVES (pictured): I had both extremes of boarding school life. The first was a year in Krugersdorp in the 1960s, when my Dad was posted to Apartheid-era South Africa

LIBBY PURVES (pictured): I had both extremes of boarding school life. The first was a year in Krugersdorp in the 1960s, when my Dad was posted to Apartheid-era South Africa

LIBBY PURVES (pictured): I had both extremes of boarding school life. The first was a year in Krugersdorp in the 1960s, when my Dad was posted to Apartheid-era South Africa

You could keep hamsters in a hut called Assisi, and gossip over smuggled Merrydown cider in dormitories. Finally you got a room of your own, where I concocted experimental flower wine in a shampoo bottle, which exploded and speckled the ceiling blue. Luckily, the nuns of that period still wore frilled medieval wimples, and never looked up.

Being ‘young ladies’ trounced education 

India Hicks, designer and entrepreneur 

I was ten years old when I arrived at Ladymede School, Aylesbury, the first of three boarding schools. My tuck had been stolen by the second week, after which I realised I needed to toughen up. 

At the age of 12, I was moved onto North Foreland Lodge, Kent, an all-girls’ school. The headmistress was so large she was nicknamed (with irony) Twiggy. We had to wear green knickers over our knickers in case someone ever saw our knickers. 

We were not allowed to phone our parents for the first two years. The school Chaplain would carry a pin in his jacket lapel, and if we fidgeted during the morning service, he would take it out and prick us. We once replaced the blackboard duster with a dead mouse during a Latin class. 

The teacher screamed when she picked it up. We were given detention and made to write out lines. The focus on education was rather secondary; raising us up to be proper young ladies came first. I fear I failed in that, so it was decided that Gordonstoun in the freezing north of Scotland would be more suitable. 

‘Plus Est En Vous’ (‘There is more in you’) was the school motto. Founded on the idea that young people flourish when their horizons are broadened, we were prepared not just for exams but also for life. 

MARGARET BEMAND (pictured with Rachel Johnson): I was one of only two girls sent to Ashdown House in the mid-70s, a boys' prep school where our brothers were boarding

MARGARET BEMAND (pictured with Rachel Johnson): I was one of only two girls sent to Ashdown House in the mid-70s, a boys' prep school where our brothers were boarding

MARGARET BEMAND (pictured with Rachel Johnson): I was one of only two girls sent to Ashdown House in the mid-70s, a boys’ prep school where our brothers were boarding

Every morning began with a characterbuilding run outside before breakfast, regardless of sleet or snow, and you learnt very quickly to lick your knife and fork to prevent anyone else nicking these off you when you went to get your Weetabix. 

Boarding school provided me not with the education my parents might have hoped for, but certainly with lifelong stories and friends.  

Punishments involved sleeping on the ‘haunted’ landing 

Rose Prince, cookery writer  

I was ten when I began my first term at Hatherop Castle School in 1972. With only about 120 girls, it was a small boarding school in a Victorian castle in the Cotswolds, complete with a tower. But there the resemblance to Malory Towers ended. Hatherop was a fashionable school, but neither progressive nor traditional, only eccentric. 

We wore no uniform. Girls swished down panelled hallways wearing everything from midi-skirts with cheesecloth peasant tops to their mother’s baggy hand-me-down tweed skirts and twinsets. We had few proper teachers. 

Latin ended when the dashing young classics master left after an alleged affair with a sixth-former; maths, taught by the Chaplain’s wife, petered out because she preferred to read us novels. We spent hours learning to sew. 

The climax of these classes was the summer fashion show on Open Day. Junior girls took to the catwalk in nightdresses they had made, senior girls in handmade bikinis. Totally inappropriate – my father didn’t know where to look. 

We slept in ‘dorms’ and behaved appallingly after lights out, knowing the school was watched over by a slow-moving matron with a leg injury. 

But when you were caught there was no detention. It was worse: you spent a night on the haunted ‘red landing’ – a huge dark hall with a camp bed and a cabinet of antique Chinese dolls staring at you. It was terrifying. 

Hatherop girls rarely went to university – we joked that Oxbridge was a ‘town up north’. No Hatherop girls became scientists or Olympians, but we were great chatters and readers which led, in my case, to a writing career. 

To be an old girl is like belonging to a very unconventional club – I have no regrets.

I went to Bedales – and into Hell 

Amanda Craig, novelist 

What irony that Malory Towers, or rather the BBC adaptation of it, has become the nation’s comfort in this crisis. For my adoration of Enid Blyton’s six-book series was why I went to Bedales in Hampshire – and into Hell. 

With its progressive, co-ed reputation, my liberal parents believed it was the perfect place. I anticipated dorm feasts, lacrosse and the company of pupils who would become what the headmistress of Malory Towers called ‘goodhearted, loyal women unafraid to forge new futures’. 

Yes, there were dorm feasts (squalid midnight picnics that left me exhausted). The sexism was relentless. So was the bullying. We had a terrifying housemistress whom everyone hated. The other housemistress – our ‘Mamselle’ – committed suicide. 

Dorms sound fun, but the total absence of privacy in adolescence is hideous. The noise, the stench, the bad food all haunt me. Unlike Malory Towers, at my school spoilt, spiteful Gwendolines ruled. Children’s books never tell you how snobbish these places are. Bedales inspired Knotshead, the fictional school in my novels. But for me, its comfort is that nothing else will be so bad again.   

Boris’s sister was my partner in crime 

Margaret Bemand, cook and food critic  

I was one of only two girls sent to Ashdown House in the mid-70s, a boys’ prep school where our brothers were boarding. 

The other girl was Rachel Johnson (the future Prime Minister’s sibling). I couldn’t have wished for a better partner in crime. 

We were expected to play football, rugby and cricket and I remember Rachel being pretty handy at these games. 

We had our own ‘wing’ in the attic, up a creaky staircase next to Matron’s rooms – and there was no way we could get up or down without her knowing. 

Luckily it was a grand old house, with fire escape ladders, which we learnt how to navigate (terrifying idea now) so in the middle of the night we could sneak out and go on a rampage with the boys. 

The food store rooms were all secured with old padlocks but I worked out that if we borrowed a knife at supper, we could unscrew the padlock, take some stores (a box of KitKats was our first heist) and then screw the padlock panel back on.  No one would know. 

It worked until it was noticed that valuable food stores were disappearing, so we hid them places where they wouldn’t look such as the coal cellar. 

There was a rumour about a stash of sweets in the roof so I went to see if it was true. As I stomped around, the ceiling fell all over Matron’s rooms below. She had me ‘rusticated’ – sent home to my parents for a few days. My mother was furious, but my father thought it was very funny. 

In dorms, we made toast with an iron 

Veronica Henry, novelist 

The Royal School Bath for Daughters of Officers of the Army was a towering presence on a hill overlooking the city. 

In 1974 it was impressive on the outside but spartan within. We had iron beds, all the rage on Instagram now, and lumpy mattresses. 

A bell clanged at 7am each day and we tumbled to the dining room to fight for the white toast (no one wanted brown), clutching precious jars of Marmite from home. 

VERONICA HENRY (pictured): The Royal School Bath for Daughters of Officers of the Army was a towering presence on a hill overlooking the city

VERONICA HENRY (pictured): The Royal School Bath for Daughters of Officers of the Army was a towering presence on a hill overlooking the city

VERONICA HENRY (pictured): The Royal School Bath for Daughters of Officers of the Army was a towering presence on a hill overlooking the city

We were spirited and naughty. We had midnight feasts on the roof, tiptoed out at dawn to plunge into the icy pool, sneaked into the back streets of Bath at the weekend to buy joss-sticks, and peroxide to bleach our hair. 

We pierced each other’s ears and plucked each other’s eyebrows. We made toast in the dormitory with an iron. We lived on Wonderloaf and an assortment of ghoulishly named dishes from the school kitchen: train smash, dead man’s leg, frogspawn. 

Our friendships ran deep and true and still do. We were stoic and resilient, most of us far from home (my parents lived in Washington DC). 

Writing and receiving letters kept us going, and we made the occasional trip to the phone box on the nearby village green, shovelling in a 2p piece in the hope of hearing a familiar voice if the homesickness got too much. 

At boarding school, you learn how much pleasure the small things can bring you. The sight of a shiny Crème Egg still makes my heart beat faster. 

We ate the yellow and white goo, dreaming of the Easter holidays when we would see our families again.  

Vodkas at midnight: I loved school! 

Tamasin Day Lewis, cookery writer 

Luckily, I arrived at Bedales the first term they stopped compulsory daily cold showers. The children there all seemed super-confident, stylish, smoked in the bushes and wore make-up and heels. 

Mixed-age dorms were brilliant: we got to know the older girls and they could teach us about boys. One term I moved into an attic with a friend called Rachel whose parents lived in India. 

Rachel brought fresh limes back from Bombay and my grandmother sent me a Fortnum’s hamper of cooked duck, chocolate Bath Oliver biscuits and a Malvern water bottle filled with vodka. 

Every night Rachel and I made vodka gimlets, I cooked pasta on an old primus stove I kept under the bed and we smoked cigarettes out of our dorm window. 

One term we made cider in Ribena bottles from the school apple orchards and hid it behind our lockers. We unscrewed the tops and a hideous aroma of sulphur dioxide emerged as the bright pink liquid shot out. 

We arranged to meet the boys at midnight in the swimming pool to drink it. But their alarm didn’t go off, so we drank the vile brew, swam and went back to bed. Boarding school life was everything I had fantasised it would be and more. I loved it.

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Maggie Beer begins free online cooking courses and shares how to make the perfect autumn risotto  https://beautytipsvilla.com/maggie-beer-begins-free-online-cooking-courses-and-shares-how-to-make-the-perfect-autumn-risotto/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=maggie-beer-begins-free-online-cooking-courses-and-shares-how-to-make-the-perfect-autumn-risotto Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:22 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8206557/Maggie-Beer-begins-free-online-cooking-courses-shares-make-perfect-autumn-risotto.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Celebrity chef Maggie Beer is helping amateur chefs perfect their skills in the kitchen with free online cooking courses.  The Australian cookbook author and MasterChef guest judge, 75, is hosting classes on Facebook and Instagram, from her kitchen in Adelaide, South Australia, in a new online series called Cook with […]

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Celebrity chef Maggie Beer is helping amateur chefs perfect their skills in the kitchen with free online cooking courses. 

The Australian cookbook author and MasterChef guest judge, 75, is hosting classes on Facebook and Instagram, from her kitchen in Adelaide, South Australia, in a new online series called Cook with Maggie.

The restaurateur shows home cooks how to whip up delicious meals in less than 20 minutes using simple ingredients which are already sitting in the pantry. 

Scroll down for video 

Celebrity chef Maggie Beer (pictured) is showing home cooks how to whip up delicious meals in less than 20 minutes with free online cooking classes

Celebrity chef Maggie Beer (pictured) is showing home cooks how to whip up delicious meals in less than 20 minutes with free online cooking classes

Celebrity chef Maggie Beer (pictured) is showing home cooks how to whip up delicious meals in less than 20 minutes with free online cooking classes

Maggie is sharing new and easy recipes for amateur chefs to follow every day on her social media accounts.

She recently shared a simple and delicious recipe for a pumpkin and oat risotto and it requires just six simple ingredients.

Using oats, milk, pumpkin, olive oil, nutmeg and parsley, Maggie created the dish in less than 20 minutes.

She recently shared a simple and delicious recipe for a pumpkin and oat risotto and it requires just six simple ingredients

She recently shared a simple and delicious recipe for a pumpkin and oat risotto and it requires just six simple ingredients

She recently shared a simple and delicious recipe for a pumpkin and oat risotto and it requires just six simple ingredients

How to make a pumpkin and oat risotto 

Ingredients:

– Pumpkin

– 1 and a half cups oats

– 3 cups full cream milk

– Nutmeg

– Parsley

– Olive oil 

Method: 

1. Drizzle olive oil on pumpkin and add salt. Spread in a tray and place in a 220 degree pre-heated oven

 2. After 15 mins, take the pumpkin out of the oven and sprinkle with verjuice before placing back in the oven for an additional five minutes

3. Pour 3 cups milk into a saucepan, mix it with some nutmeg and place on a stove 

4. Before bowling point, gently pour oats in with milk and stir. Add a teaspoon of salt and let it shimmer for 10-12 mins  

5. Mix pumpkin in with the oats and milk then add some olive oil, pepper and parsley 

6. Roast walnuts in oven for five minutes and rub skin off in a tea towel 

7. Serve the oat and pumpkin risotto with walnuts sprinkled on top

First she drizzled some olive oil and salt on the pumpkin before placing it in the oven for 15 minutes.

Then she sprinkled the pumpkin with verjuice before placing it back in the oven for an additional five minutes.

Maggie made the risotto base by pouring three cups of milk in a saucepan, mixing it with nutmeg and pouring in oats before it reached boiling point.

She then mixed the pumpkin with the milk and oats and served the dish with walnuts on top.

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Seven stylish lounge sets for under $99 that will keep you comfortable and cost during isolation https://beautytipsvilla.com/seven-stylish-lounge-sets-for-under-99-that-will-keep-you-comfortable-and-cost-during-isolation/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=seven-stylish-lounge-sets-for-under-99-that-will-keep-you-comfortable-and-cost-during-isolation Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:15 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8202363/Seven-stylish-lounge-sets-99-comfortable-cost-isolation.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Comfort became king almost overnight for millions of Australians working from home under strict social distancing laws, with stilettos swapped for slippers and trouser suits traded for cosy lounge sets. Tracksuits, elasticated pants and loose-fitting jumpers dominated clothing sales in March, with the ‘loungewear’ category seeing a 120 percent increase […]

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Comfort became king almost overnight for millions of Australians working from home under strict social distancing laws, with stilettos swapped for slippers and trouser suits traded for cosy lounge sets.

Tracksuits, elasticated pants and loose-fitting jumpers dominated clothing sales in March, with the ‘loungewear’ category seeing a 120 percent increase in demand year on year according to new data from online retailer The Iconic.

And with little sign of relaxation around coronavirus restrictions, sales of trendy athleisure wear looks set to skyrocket.

ASOS, Pretty Little Thing, Showpo and an up-and-coming Australian sleepwear label have some of the most stylishly comfortable and affordable clothing on the market right now – and all still delivering to your front door through COVID-19.

Australian sleepwear label Midnight Mischief are running a sale on these silk pyjamas, which come in pink, black and navy with the option to stitch your name or initials above the pocket

Australian sleepwear label Midnight Mischief are running a sale on these silk pyjamas, which come in pink, black and navy with the option to stitch your name or initials above the pocket

Australian sleepwear label Midnight Mischief are running a sale on these silk pyjamas, which come in pink, black and navy with the option to stitch your name or initials above the pocket

1. THE SILK MONOGRAM SET – $89

Australian sleepwear label Midnight Mischief are running a sale on silk pyjamas, which come in pink, black and navy with the option to stitch your name or initials above the left breast pocket.

The luxurious sets, which include a button-up top and shorts and come in sizes four to 16, usually cost $99.95 but are currently reduced to $89.95 and available for pre-order with deliveries shipping mid-April. 

The sets come with a five star rating from satisfied customers.

2. FLARES AND AN OVER-SIZED HOODIE – $54 

Fast fashion giant Pretty Little Thing is taking isolation dressing seriously, with an entire category dedicated to ‘Staying Home’ on its website.

Almost 2,000 affordably priced gym wear, pyjamas, sweaters and lingerie fill are currently available under the Stay Home heading, including comfy tracksuits with flared bottoms and over-sized hoodies.

The matching sets come in peach and grey and cost $27 for the top and trousers. 

Fast fashion giant Pretty Little Thing is taking isolation dressing seriously, with an entire category dedicated to 'Staying Home' on its website

Fast fashion giant Pretty Little Thing is taking isolation dressing seriously, with an entire category dedicated to 'Staying Home' on its website

The section includes brightly coloured, comfy tracksuits like this one for $54

The section includes brightly coloured, comfy tracksuits like this one for $54

Fast fashion giant Pretty Little Thing is taking isolation dressing seriously, with an entire category dedicated to ‘Staying Home’ on its website. The section includes brightly coloured, comfy tracksuits like this one for $54

3. THE BOHEMIAN BEACH SET – $98

Internationally popular fashion site ASOS has enough pages filled with plush pyjamas and elasticated trousers to keep you scrolling for weeks.

Stock ranges from basic tracksuits to stylish sets, including a knitted crochet bralet and matching high-waisted trousers for $98, equally perfect for lounging on the sofa or a well deserved day at the beach when social distancing laws are relaxed.

ASOS has extended its refund time to 90 days to customers peace of mind while shopping during COVID-19.

ASOS has hundreds of pages filled with stylish leisurewear, including this knitted crochet bralet and matching high-waisted trousers for $98

ASOS has hundreds of pages filled with stylish leisurewear, including this knitted crochet bralet and matching high-waisted trousers for $98

ASOS has hundreds of pages filled with stylish leisurewear, including this knitted crochet bralet and matching high-waisted trousers for $98

The most popular pants in Australia for isolation

Thousands of women are rushing to get their hands on the $89 trousers

Thousands of women are rushing to get their hands on the $89 trousers

Thousands of women are rushing to get their hands on the $89 trousers

Australian label Petal and Pup restocked its signature ‘Rockford‘ pants on Sunday due to high demand.

The $89 ‘loungewear’ trousers had been viewed online by 1,036 shoppers, less than 24 hours after reappearing the brand’s website.

Available in sizes extra small to extra large, the Rockford pants are high waisted with an elasticated band, making them supremely comfortable and the perfect choice for working from home.

The wide-legged tailoring gives the trousers a stylish flair, but the fabric is not lined and can be slightly see-through in the sun so the brand advises slipping nude underwear or bicycle shorts underneath.  

The pants are made from polyester and spandex and should be machine washed on a cold setting.

A matching top is available for those looking for an all-in-one outfit. 

4. THE BELTED TWO PIECE – $35

Among hundreds of neon hued tracksuits and sultry leotards, Pretty Little Thing’s Stay Home section offers a select number of sophisticated ensembles in knitted fabrics and neutral shades.

The Oatmeal Rib-Belted lounge set is one of them, and it’s currently reduced from $60 to $35.

Available in generic sizes small to medium and medium to large, the set strikes the right balance between comfort and corporate, making it the perfect outfit for conference calls and Netflix viewing.

This sophisticated lounge set from Pretty Little Thing is now reduced to $35 and strikes the perfect balance between comfort and corporate

This sophisticated lounge set from Pretty Little Thing is now reduced to $35 and strikes the perfect balance between comfort and corporate

This sophisticated lounge set from Pretty Little Thing is now reduced to $35 and strikes the perfect balance between comfort and corporate

5. THE CLASSIC TRACKSUIT

ASOS knows the power of a simple classic and so do its customers, which is why its in-house designed two-piece tracksuit is selling out fast.

The white hoodie and slim fit bottoms cost $64 and are available in sizes four to 18.

Made from organic cotton, the set is easy on the environment as well as your bank balance. 

ASOS knows the power of a simple classic and so do its customers, which is why this $64 in-house designed tracksuit is selling out fast

ASOS knows the power of a simple classic and so do its customers, which is why this $64 in-house designed tracksuit is selling out fast

ASOS knows the power of a simple classic and so do its customers, which is why this $64 in-house designed tracksuit is selling out fast

6. THE ALL-IN-ONE – $32

All-in-one jumpsuits are the perfect uniform for working from home, offering comfort, style and practicality in equal measure.

Pretty Little Thing stocks dozens of silhouettes, from high-necks and v-necks to racerbacks and entirely backless designs.

The $32 Sports Stripe one-piece is functional and flattering, suitable for all shapes with sizes running from two through 14.

Billionaire business mogul Kylie Jenner donned a similar black unitard from Naked Wardrobe on Monday to speak to her 169 million Instagram followers about the importance of social distancing.

The $32 Sports Stripe one-piece is functional and flattering, suitable for all shapes with sizes running from two through 14

The $32 Sports Stripe one-piece is functional and flattering, suitable for all shapes with sizes running from two through 14

The $32 Sports Stripe one-piece is functional and flattering, suitable for all shapes with sizes running from two through 14

7.  THE SUMMER KNIT – $79.95

Sydney fashion label Showpo is perhaps best known for floral, flirty dresses and remarkably affordable wedding dresses.

But like any good business, the brand has adapted to life under lockdown by ramping up promotions of comfortable jumpers and cosy knit wear.

The $79.95 Katerina knitted two-piece features shorts and a sleeveless v-neck top stamped with four brown buttons down the front.

The delicate set is available in two large-fitting generic sizes, small and medium, and should be hand-washed only. 

The $79.95 Katerina knitted two-piece features shorts and a sleeveless v-neck top stamped with four brown buttons down the front

The $79.95 Katerina knitted two-piece features shorts and a sleeveless v-neck top stamped with four brown buttons down the front

The $79.95 Katerina knitted two-piece features shorts and a sleeveless v-neck top stamped with four brown buttons down the front

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Dad sets up supermarket at home so that his 87-year-old mother can do weekly shop in isolation  https://beautytipsvilla.com/dad-sets-up-supermarket-at-home-so-that-his-87-year-old-mother-can-do-weekly-shop-in-isolation/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=dad-sets-up-supermarket-at-home-so-that-his-87-year-old-mother-can-do-weekly-shop-in-isolation Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:11 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8206595/Dad-sets-supermarket-home-87-year-old-mother-weekly-shop-isolation.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 An Australian dad has set up a miniature Coles supermarket in his home so that his 87-year-old mother can do her weekly supermarket shop while she is stuck in isolation. Jason van Genderen, from the New South Wales Central Coast, set it up for his mum – who has Alzheimer’s […]

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An Australian dad has set up a miniature Coles supermarket in his home so that his 87-year-old mother can do her weekly supermarket shop while she is stuck in isolation.

Jason van Genderen, from the New South Wales Central Coast, set it up for his mum – who has Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia – because she loves going to the supermarket each week, but she hasn’t been able to do so for the past month because she is isolating with her family to prevent her from getting coronavirus.

Posting on Facebook, Jason shared a video of the heart-warming experience, and he said it ‘is possible to let the sunshine in when we can’ despite it being a difficult time.

Scroll down for video 

An Australian dad has set up a miniature Coles supermarket in his home so that his 87-year-old mother can do her weekly supermarket shop while she is stuck in isolation (the supermarket setup pictured)

An Australian dad has set up a miniature Coles supermarket in his home so that his 87-year-old mother can do her weekly supermarket shop while she is stuck in isolation (the supermarket setup pictured)

An Australian dad has set up a miniature Coles supermarket in his home so that his 87-year-old mother can do her weekly supermarket shop while she is stuck in isolation (the supermarket setup pictured)

Jason van Genderen, from the New South Wales Central Coast, set it up for his mum (pictured) - who has Alzheimer's and vascular dementia - because she loves going to the supermarket

Jason van Genderen, from the New South Wales Central Coast, set it up for his mum (pictured) - who has Alzheimer's and vascular dementia - because she loves going to the supermarket

Jason van Genderen, from the New South Wales Central Coast, set it up for his mum (pictured) – who has Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia – because she loves going to the supermarket

‘We’ve been living in home isolation for the past four weeks,’ Jason said in the video.

‘Something that is a little bit unique to our family makeup is that my mum lives with us. She is 87 and she has Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia. 

‘Her routine has really been thrown and just trying to make sense of what the week is is blown to pieces for her.’

He continued to say that one of the ‘big things mum hangs her week on’ is the weekly supermarket shop – which she does with her family in tow.

And so, rather than abandon it completely, Jason and his wife and two children set up a mini supermarket at home so she can get her shopping done and he took his mum to the supermarket for her fruit, veg and produce.

Due to the fact that his mother has been at home to prevent her from getting coronavirus, Jason said he wanted to 'bring the shops' to her (the supermarket pictured)

Due to the fact that his mother has been at home to prevent her from getting coronavirus, Jason said he wanted to 'bring the shops' to her (the supermarket pictured)

Due to the fact that his mother has been at home to prevent her from getting coronavirus, Jason said he wanted to ‘bring the shops’ to her (the supermarket pictured)

His mum went along with her shopping list to pick up an array of her essentials including her favourite morning breakfast Rice Puffs (pictured)

His mum went along with her shopping list to pick up an array of her essentials including her favourite morning breakfast Rice Puffs (pictured)

His mum went along with her shopping list to pick up an array of her essentials including her favourite morning breakfast Rice Puffs (pictured)

The 87-year-old picked up a host of items on her shopping list (pictured), including Easter eggs for her grandchildren

The 87-year-old picked up a host of items on her shopping list (pictured), including Easter eggs for her grandchildren

The 87-year-old picked up a host of items on her shopping list (pictured), including Easter eggs for her grandchildren

At the supermarket, Jason’s mum was greeted by his wife Megan and two kids Evie and Art as checkout assistants.

There were also a range of Coles products on offer on their kitchen bench.

‘Grab your bag and I’ll come and take you shopping!’ Jason told his disbelieving mother. 

‘It’s a bit hard because we can’t take you to the shops, so we thought we’d take the shops to you!’ Jason said.

His mother was visibly touched by the gesture, laughing and saying: ‘What is wrong with him?’ about her son. 

She picked up some bananas, Brussels sprouts and two packets of the Rice Puffs, that she has ‘every morning’.

She also got some Easter eggs for her grandchildren and some pork sirloin for her dinner.

‘Have a good day Madam!’ Art said at the checkout at the end.

Her grandson Art told her to 'have a good day Madam!' at the checkout at the end of the video (pictured)

Her grandson Art told her to 'have a good day Madam!' at the checkout at the end of the video (pictured)

Her grandson Art told her to ‘have a good day Madam!’ at the checkout at the end of the video (pictured)

Jason shared the heart-warming video on Facebook, where he was met with thousands of people praising him for his clever idea

Jason shared the heart-warming video on Facebook, where he was met with thousands of people praising him for his clever idea

Jason shared the heart-warming video on Facebook, where he was met with thousands of people praising him for his clever idea 

Sharing the experience on Facebook, Jason was met with thousands of people praising him for his creative idea.

‘I loved seeing this. A gorgeous family,’ one woman posted.

‘This is gold and really touched my heart,’ another added.  

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Joy Behar denies that she is leaving The View in 2022 https://beautytipsvilla.com/joy-behar-denies-that-she-is-leaving-the-view-in-2022/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=joy-behar-denies-that-she-is-leaving-the-view-in-2022 Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:09 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8206381/Joy-Behar-denies-leaving-View-2022.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Joy Behar has denied speculation that she is retiring from The View when her contract ends in 2022, insisting that she is ‘not leaving.’ The 77-year-old’s co-host Whoopi Goldberg asked her to address a Variety report about her alleged departure on Thursday morning’s show, prompting her to let out a laugh.   […]

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Joy Behar has denied speculation that she is retiring from The View when her contract ends in 2022, insisting that she is ‘not leaving.’

The 77-year-old’s co-host Whoopi Goldberg asked her to address a Variety report about her alleged departure on Thursday morning’s show, prompting her to let out a laugh.  

‘They’re always talking about me leaving the show,’ Behar said. ‘But I’m not leaving the show. Let me say the rumors of my retirement have been greatly exaggerated.’

Not happening: Joy Behar denied a report that she is retiring from The View, insisting on Thursday morning's show that she's 'not leaving'

Not happening: Joy Behar denied a report that she is retiring from The View, insisting on Thursday morning's show that she's 'not leaving'

Not happening: Joy Behar denied a report that she is retiring from The View, insisting on Thursday morning’s show that she’s ‘not leaving’ 

Denial: The 77-year-old told her co-stars Whoopi Goldberg, Meghan McCain, and Sunny Hostin that the rumors of her retirement 'have been greatly exaggerated'

Denial: The 77-year-old told her co-stars Whoopi Goldberg, Meghan McCain, and Sunny Hostin that the rumors of her retirement 'have been greatly exaggerated'

Denial: The 77-year-old told her co-stars Whoopi Goldberg, Meghan McCain, and Sunny Hostin that the rumors of her retirement ‘have been greatly exaggerated’ 

She noted that the coronavirus pandemic has derailed any lofty retirement plans she might have had in the future.

‘You know, here’s the thing, what am I going to do?’ she said. ‘This pandemic has changed the game. At one point you think, “Gee, I could retire and take a cruise around the world.” 

‘I won’t even watch reruns of Love Boat at this point. So, where am I gonna go? What will I do? I need to be on television.’ 

Behar went on to joke that she provides ’employment for right-wing media.’ 

‘I mean I’m a job creator over at Breitbart,’ she said. ‘Everything I say appears on Breitbart. I don’t see how I could leave.’ 

Hitting back: 'Where am I gonna go? What will I do? I need to be on television,' Behar said

Hitting back: 'Where am I gonna go? What will I do? I need to be on television,' Behar said

Hitting back: ‘Where am I gonna go? What will I do? I need to be on television,’ Behar said 

Not having it: Goldberg said it would be a big deal for her if Behar left the show, and McCain agreed, saying they won't let her leave

Not having it: Goldberg said it would be a big deal for her if Behar left the show, and McCain agreed, saying they won't let her leave

Not having it: Goldberg said it would be a big deal for her if Behar left the show, and McCain agreed, saying they won't let her leave

Not having it: Goldberg said it would be a big deal for her if Behar left the show, and McCain agreed, saying they won't let her leave

Not having it: Goldberg said it would be a big deal for her if Behar left the show, and McCain agreed, saying they won’t let her leave 

Behar and her co-hosts — Goldberg, Meghan McCain, and Sunny Hostin — filmed the show via satellite from their respective homes. 

Goldberg said it would be a big deal for her if Behar left the show, and McCain agreed, recalling how she immediately called her co-star after reading the report. 

‘You’re not leaving. It’s not an option. None of us are going to allow you to go,’ McCain told Behar. 

On Wednesday, Variety published a report saying Behar plans to leave The View when her contract is up in the summer of 2022. 

The outlet stated she had revealed her upcoming departure in a new interview for the paperback edition of journalist Ramin Setoodeh’s book The Explosive Inside Story of The View.

‘I have a three-year contract,’ she is quoted as saying in the book. ‘But that doesn’t mean I can’t leave if I want to, because they can’t really do anything to me at this point. I don’t see myself staying for more [time]. That’s it!

Response: The co-host referred to a Variety report that stated she plans to leave the ABC daytime talk show when her contract is up in the summer of 2022

Response: The co-host referred to a Variety report that stated she plans to leave the ABC daytime talk show when her contract is up in the summer of 2022

Response: The co-host referred to a Variety report that stated she plans to leave the ABC daytime talk show when her contract is up in the summer of 2022

Claim: Behar referenced the quotes on Thursday's show, saying she told the reporter: 'If I'm as fabulous in 2022 as I am now, I'll probably be here'

Claim: Behar referenced the quotes on Thursday's show, saying she told the reporter: 'If I'm as fabulous in 2022 as I am now, I'll probably be here'

Claim: Behar referenced the quotes on Thursday’s show, saying she told the reporter: ‘If I’m as fabulous in 2022 as I am now, I’ll probably be here’

‘I could be wrong. If I’m as fabulous in [2022] as I am now, I’ll think about. But the chances of that happening… You know, time marches on. I’m not a kid.’ 

Behar referenced a quote from the interview on Thursday’s show, saying she told the reporter: ‘If I’m as fabulous in 2022 as I am now, I’ll probably be here.’

‘You just don’t know,’ she stressed. ‘No one knows what they are going to do in the next two years. Look at what just happened to all of us in this world. We never predicted this. You can’t predict anything. 

‘But as of now, as of today the answer is no. I’m going nowhere.’ 

An ABC spokesman has also denied that Behar is leaving the show.   

‘This is not true,’ the rep stated. ‘Joy was asked what happens at the end of her contract and as she herself made clear in the interview, if she’s “as fabulous in [2022] as I am now,” she will be in her seat at the table.’ 

Looking back: Behar, a vocal Democrat, was one of the original co-hosts when the talk show premiered in August 1997. She has been on the show longer than any other co-host

Looking back: Behar, a vocal Democrat, was one of the original co-hosts when the talk show premiered in August 1997. She has been on the show longer than any other co-host

Looking back: Behar, a vocal Democrat, was one of the original co-hosts when the talk show premiered in August 1997. She has been on the show longer than any other co-host

Are we clear? 'You can't predict anything,' Behar said. 'But as of now, as of today the answer is no. I’m going nowhere'

Are we clear? 'You can't predict anything,' Behar said. 'But as of now, as of today the answer is no. I’m going nowhere'

Are we clear? ‘You can’t predict anything,’ Behar said. ‘But as of now, as of today the answer is no. I’m going nowhere’

Behar, a vocal Democrat, has been on The View for 21 seasons — longer than any other co-host, including the show’s creator Barbara Walters, who departed in 2014 at the age of 84. 

She was one of the original co-hosts when the talk show premiered in August 1997. In addition to Walters, she sat at the iconic table with Meredith Vieira, Star Jones, and Debbie Matenopoulos, all of whom have moved on from the show. 

Behar was fired in 2013 when ABC network executives attempted to make The View less political but continued to make guest appearances. 

The Great Gasbag: An A–Z Study Guide to Surviving Trump World author returned to the show full-time two years later and has been a co-host ever since. 

Behar announced on March 13 that she was taking a leave from The View as a precaution amid the coronavirus pandemic, saying: I’m in a higher risk group because of my age, but I’m perfectly healthy.’  

After her co-hosts started working remotely, she returned to the show via satellite while self-isolating in her Hamptons home. 

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Marie Kondo reveals how to work from home while looking after kids https://beautytipsvilla.com/marie-kondo-reveals-how-to-work-from-home-while-looking-after-kids/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=marie-kondo-reveals-how-to-work-from-home-while-looking-after-kids Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:05 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8206533/Marie-Kondo-reveals-work-home-looking-kids.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 With millions of people now working from home amid the coronavirus pandemic, professionals are having to deal with a whole host of new challenges, from finding a suitable workspace in their house to figuring out a balance between their jobs and their personal lives.  But for many, the main struggle […]

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With millions of people now working from home amid the coronavirus pandemic, professionals are having to deal with a whole host of new challenges, from finding a suitable workspace in their house to figuring out a balance between their jobs and their personal lives. 

But for many, the main struggle has been managing their careers while also trying to take care of their kids – the majority of whom are also currently at home after schools and daycares across the country shut their doors to the public. 

Thankfully, there is some help on hand from organization expert and mother-of-two Marie Kondo, 34, who has now translated her tidying expertise into a more professional capacity, something that she has fine-tuned after spending weeks working from home herself. 

Expert advice: Organization expert and mother-of-two Marie Kondo has revealed her top tips for balancing your job and childcare while working from home

Expert advice: Organization expert and mother-of-two Marie Kondo has revealed her top tips for balancing your job and childcare while working from home

Expert advice: Organization expert and mother-of-two Marie Kondo has revealed her top tips for balancing your job and childcare while working from home 

Expertise: The 34-year-old has two young daughters with her husband Takumi, and the family of four is currently all at home amid the coronavirus pandemic

Expertise: The 34-year-old has two young daughters with her husband Takumi, and the family of four is currently all at home amid the coronavirus pandemic

Expertise: The 34-year-old has two young daughters with her husband Takumi, and the family of four is currently all at home amid the coronavirus pandemic 

The organizational guru-turned Netflix star, who has just published her latest book, Joy at Work, has now shared a series of tips for those struggling to balance working from home with childcare. 

In an interview with People, Marie shared four methods for achieving perfect harmony in your home, for both you and your children, revealing that the first step is to ensure your kids have their own regimented schedule in place. 

She insists that giving your children a series of daily tasks and activities, ‘whether it’s making breakfast together, reading, or doing puzzles’ is ‘so important’ to help them achieve structure in their day-to-day lives, and to help them feel a greater sense of normality during this time of upheaval. 

Marie Kondo reveals how to make working from home with kids easier 

  • Give your children a daily schedule 
  • Make sure your kids are aware of your daily schedule 
  • Accept that tantrums happen, but always discuss the cause 
  • Make tidying a group activity so that your kids want to help out 

Once you have given your children a schedule, Marie says it is just as important to ensure that they are aware of what your daily line-up looks like, and so they know what times during the day you aren’t available for playtime. 

She admits that this doesn’t always work, but it will at the very least help to set a few boundaries for everyone in the family.  

‘When you’re designating a time for work, share your intention with your family members,’ she explained. ‘I try to close the office door when I’m working, but sometimes they will still knock really loudly and try to come in.’

As for any tantrums that yours kids may throw, Marie says the key is to take it all in your stride, and accept that meltdowns are part of the process. 

She advises that it is ‘quite natural for kids to have tantrums’, and that there is no point in worrying about it – they key is to address the feelings that prompted the meltdown in the first place. 

Schedule: Marie advised that it is important to ensure that your children have their own daily routine, and that they are aware of what your schedule involves

Schedule: Marie advised that it is important to ensure that your children have their own daily routine, and that they are aware of what your schedule involves

Schedule: Marie advised that it is important to ensure that your children have their own daily routine, and that they are aware of what your schedule involves  

‘I take the time to listen,’ she revealed. ‘Once they’ve calmed down, I ask them what’s bothering them and then, to let them know I understand.

‘I say, “So that made you sad,” or “That’s what you didn’t like.” I try to honor their feelings.’

Her final tip for a harmonious home environment? Take the time to tidy the house together as a family. And for those who insist that their children won’t clean up without a fight, Marie insists that is not the case.  

Coming up:  Marie just release a new book, Joy at Work, a follow up to her bestseller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up

Coming up:  Marie just release a new book, Joy at Work, a follow up to her bestseller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up

Coming up:  Marie just release a new book, Joy at Work, a follow up to her bestseller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up

She notes that her own children – little girls Satsuki and Miko – might not tidy up on their own, but they are more than willing to help when she and her husband Takumi turn it into a group activity. 

‘The will [tidy up] when I ask them to!’ she revealed. ‘We make it a daily practice and tidy together at the end of the day.’        

Marie’s latest working from home tips come after she shared some hacks to help people make the most out of working from home amid the pandemic.   

The mother-of-two shared her top tips for turning your home into a productive space, revealing three simple techniques to give your at-home working life a serious boost. 

And while the tips were penned prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, and the subsequent quarantines that were put in place as a result of it, Marie’s tips have never been more relevant, as millions of people have been told to hunker down at home and work from the safety of their own houses. 

According to Marie, the secret to at-home productivity is ritual and routine, with the tidying guru noting that it’s important to set certain things in place that help you to distinguish between your workspace and your personal space. 

Easy as can be: Last month, the Netflix star shared three simple methods for becoming more productive while working from home

Easy as can be: Last month, the Netflix star shared three simple methods for becoming more productive while working from home

Easy as can be: Last month, the Netflix star shared three simple methods for becoming more productive while working from home 

‘That way, you’re transitioning from your personal home life to work,’ she said, according to Domino. 

One simple way to achieve this, Marie suggests, is through scent. 

The organization pro sprays a very specific fragrance in her home office, opting for a fresh and invigorating scent: peppermint. 

Her choice of fragrance gets a thumbs up from experts, who recently revealed to DailyMail.com that mint is a great choice of spirit-boosting scent to mix with mood-enhancing citruses. 

Marie Kondo reveals how to make the most out of your working-from-home space 

  • Implement rituals that separate your work time from your personal time
  • Use scent to identify your workspace versus your home space
  • Rely on sound to signify the start of your working day  
  • Avoid working on soft spaces like a bed or the sofa, and set up on a hard work surface, like a dining table 

NEST New York founder Laura Slatkin explained that fresh aquatic scents are also great for helping to invigorate you and provide a boost of positivity, noting that ‘notes of ocean breezes and coconut’ will help to make you feel better in an instant. 

Similarly, if you don’t want your home to be filled with a pure citrus scent, Slatkin recommends mixing it with something else – naming mint as a great example.

Moving on to another sense, Marie says she also relies on sound to help her separate work and play, revealing to Domino: ‘I also ring my trusty tuner – that’s how I know it’s time to work.’ 

According to the publication, Marie likes to tap her tuning fork against a crystal, before waving the instrument around the room to ‘quiet her thoughts and take in the energy of the space’, helping her to start the working day with a calm mind. 

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up author’s final tip, although perhaps the most traditional, will likely be the most upsetting for many people who have hunkered down on their sofas and beds over the past few weeks. 

According to Marie, avoiding all soft areas of your apartment and working on a hard surface is the best way to maximize productivity – whether that’s a coffee table, a breakfast bar, or a dining room table.         

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Paulina Porizkova celebrates her 55th birthday with a photo of herself modeling a gold bikini https://beautytipsvilla.com/paulina-porizkova-celebrates-her-55th-birthday-with-a-photo-of-herself-modeling-a-gold-bikini/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=paulina-porizkova-celebrates-her-55th-birthday-with-a-photo-of-herself-modeling-a-gold-bikini Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:04:00 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8206721/Paulina-Porizkova-celebrates-55th-birthday-photo-modeling-gold-bikini.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Paulina Porizkova has celebrated her 55th birthday by sharing a sultry photo of herself modeling a tiny gold bikini during her pre-lockdown vacation in Costa Rica last month. In her candid Instagram post, the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit star admitted that she hasn’t always liked the way she looked, but she […]

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Paulina Porizkova has celebrated her 55th birthday by sharing a sultry photo of herself modeling a tiny gold bikini during her pre-lockdown vacation in Costa Rica last month.

In her candid Instagram post, the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit star admitted that she hasn’t always liked the way she looked, but she was determined to ‘feel pretty today’ on her birthday.   

‘TBT. Less than two months ago, the world was still a familiar place. And I was basking in its best incarnation, here in Costa Rica,’ she wrote on Thursday. ‘Humor me, if you will, today. I’m now 55, and I have gone through half a lifetime only liking the way I look in retrospect.’ 

Memories: Paulina Porizkova celebrated her 55th birthday on Thursday by sharing a sultry throwback photo of herself modeling a tiny gold bikini in Costa Rica last month

Memories: Paulina Porizkova celebrated her 55th birthday on Thursday by sharing a sultry throwback photo of herself modeling a tiny gold bikini in Costa Rica last month

Memories: Paulina Porizkova celebrated her 55th birthday on Thursday by sharing a sultry throwback photo of herself modeling a tiny gold bikini in Costa Rica last month 

Home sweet home: For the past three weeks, Paulina has been quarantined at her home in the country with her sons Jonathan and Oliver, her dog Ludwig, and her cat Oskar

Home sweet home: For the past three weeks, Paulina has been quarantined at her home in the country with her sons Jonathan and Oliver, her dog Ludwig, and her cat Oskar

Home sweet home: For the past three weeks, Paulina has been quarantined at her home in the country with her sons Jonathan and Oliver, her dog Ludwig, and her cat Oskar 

Paulina looks absolutely stunning in the snapshot, which shows her posing on a deck in the jungle wearing nothing but a gold sequin string bikini as she looks off into the distance. 

Although she has been a famous model since the early 1980s, she noted that she didn’t always realize her beauty.  

‘I look at old photos and realize how good I had it,’ she explained. ‘So today, I am looking at myself, (in an admittedly flattering photo) and think, “hey, I’m a good 55-year-old! ” I will feel pretty today. 

‘And endlessly grateful for all the gifts life has bestowed on me thus far,’ she added. ‘They’ve been many. Quarantine is a great time to sift through them all.’

Paulina ended the post with numerous hashtags, including ‘#betweenjloandbettywhite’ and ‘#flattenthecurve.’ 

The cover star, who stayed in a rental property called Villa Neruda, has shared numerous throwback photos from her trip since she returned home in mid-March.

Goal: In her candid post, Paulina (pictured in 1985) admitted that she hasn't always liked the way she looked, but she was determined to 'feel pretty today'

Goal: In her candid post, Paulina (pictured in 1985) admitted that she hasn't always liked the way she looked, but she was determined to 'feel pretty today'

Goal: In her candid post, Paulina (pictured in 1985) admitted that she hasn’t always liked the way she looked, but she was determined to ‘feel pretty today’

For the past three weeks, Paulina has been quarantined at her home in the country with her sons Jonathan and Oliver, her dog Ludwig, and her cat Oskar. 

The day before her birthday, she posted a video of herself using a KitchenAid to mix the batter for her cake while her cat stood close by. 

‘Baking my birthday cake with a little help from Oskar. #oskartheca,’ she wrote. ‘It will eventually be a strawberry cake. I hope. It sort of reminds me a little Czech cookbook from I think the 1960’s, called “Grandma cooks for her fiftieth”. No, it was not a joke book. 

‘It was a real cookbook for ladies to help them celebrate their big birthdays,’ she explained. ‘In my case though, I’m only doing my cake — and by choice cause I love baking. My boys and men are taking care of everything else tomorrow. Even the dishes.’ 

Earlier in the week, she posted a snapshot of herself dressed as Rosie the Riveter while urging people to stay home amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

‘We will do it. There is no other way forward but through. I, like so many of you, am sitting at home hearing horrifying news from the front lines,’ she wrote. ‘I am immensely grateful to the people on the front lines. And I want to let them know, I want to help them. But my gratitude can only take on the form of inactivity. 

Baking: The day before her birthday, she posted a video of herself using a KitchenAid to mix the batter for her cake while her cat stood close by

Baking: The day before her birthday, she posted a video of herself using a KitchenAid to mix the batter for her cake while her cat stood close by

Baking: The day before her birthday, she posted a video of herself using a KitchenAid to mix the batter for her cake while her cat stood close by

Baking: The day before her birthday, she posted a video of herself using a KitchenAid to mix the batter for her cake while her cat stood close by

Baking: The day before her birthday, she posted a video of herself using a KitchenAid to mix the batter for her cake while her cat stood close by

‘Inactivity to a level never before witnessed. Every day I wake up and want to do something to help, and find out the only help I CAN give is to stay at home. It’s the definition of frustration: not being able to do the very task you most want to do.’

She noted that she lucky to be quarantined in her home in the country with her loved ones, but she admitted that she is human and just wants to go to a restaurant. 

Paulina added: ‘Of course, I can and will pull out my sewing machine and start working on those masks —but what’s really important and helpful to all is the most boring part of all: STAY THE F**K AT HOME.’  

The mother of two has been using her time in quarantine to tend to her garden, clean her home, and knit — all while sporting wild hair. 

She has been taking to Instagram to share hilarious photos of herself passing the time while hunkering down in her spacious home in the country.

Paulina marked 14 days in quarantine by sharing a photo of herself posing in front of the tall grass and weeds in her garden, admitting that she didn’t have time to tend to it before. 

Motivator: Earlier in the week, she posted a snapshot of herself dressed as Rosie the Riveter while urging people to stay home amid the coronavirus pandemic

Motivator: Earlier in the week, she posted a snapshot of herself dressed as Rosie the Riveter while urging people to stay home amid the coronavirus pandemic

Motivator: Earlier in the week, she posted a snapshot of herself dressed as Rosie the Riveter while urging people to stay home amid the coronavirus pandemic

Putting in work: Paulina marked 14 days in quarantine  by sharing a photo of herself posing in front of the weeds in her garden, admitting that she didn't have time to tend to it before

Putting in work: Paulina marked 14 days in quarantine  by sharing a photo of herself posing in front of the weeds in her garden, admitting that she didn't have time to tend to it before

Putting in work: Paulina marked 14 days in quarantine  by sharing a photo of herself posing in front of the weeds in her garden, admitting that she didn’t have time to tend to it before

She is dressed in a teal tank top and black pants, which she appropriately accessorized with a gardening hat and gloves. 

Her blue velour sweatshirt is hanging on her white picket fence, suggesting she took it off after she started to work up a sweat. 

‘Quarantine day 14. Gardening is hard. All parts of me ache. See those tall grasses behind me? All weeds that took root last year when I didn’t have time for my garden,’ she captioned the image. 

‘All need to be pulled out by — me. #whoneedsagym #flattenthecurve #gardening #gardenlife,’ she added. ‘And THEN I can start fertilizing, double digging and raking — BEFORE planting. It doesn’t help all the men in my household are busy at their computers. (Yes, I’m HUGELY grateful I have a plot of land on which I can garden.)’ 

On her ninth day in quarantine,’ she shared a hilarious photo of her blonde hair sticking up in every direction after not washing it for nearly a week. 

‘So, this is what happens when you wash your hair in well water with your son’s shampoo, put it up in a bun for five days while you clean and cook and garden, and then take it down,’ she joked. 

‘Anyone got any good ideas on what to call this fab and never before seen hairstyle? I’d like to make it a trend. And yes, I accidentally photobombed #oskarthecat.’ 

Keeping busy: Paulina has been taking to Instagram to share comical photos of herself passing the time while quarantined, including images of her wacky hair

Keeping busy: Paulina has been taking to Instagram to share comical photos of herself passing the time while quarantined, including images of her wacky hair

Keeping busy: Paulina has been taking to Instagram to share comical photos of herself passing the time while quarantined, including images of her wacky hair 

Relatable: Paulina has blamed 'well water,' her 'son's shampoo,' and messy buns for her untamed hair, which sticks up in all directions when she takes it down

Relatable: Paulina has blamed 'well water,' her 'son's shampoo,' and messy buns for her untamed hair, which sticks up in all directions when she takes it down

Relatable: Paulina has blamed ‘well water,’ her ‘son’s shampoo,’ and messy buns for her untamed hair, which sticks up in all directions when she takes it down

Paulina also blamed the well water and her son’s shampoo when she shared a similar shot of her wacky hair the week before. 

‘This is what happens when you wash your hair with your son’s shampoo in well water, then wrap it in a turban and forget it while you clean the kitchen cupboards. A new fashion idea? Sort of harks back to the 80’s, right?’ she captioned a photo of herself standing in her kitchen with her long locks sticking up and tangled. 

Another equally comical photo shows Paulina drinking straight out of a bottle of whiskey while sweeping her kitchen floor. 

‘Yup, with all that cooking and cleaning mama needs her TX whiskey,’ she wrote. ‘(Thank you brother Kym for introducing us.)’

The Sports Illustrated Swimsuit star has also been taking her dog and cat for walks in the woods surrounding her home. 

While her daily quarantine posts have been mostly comical and uplifting, she is still mourning the loss of her estranged husband, The Cars frontman Ric Ocasek, who died in September at the age of 75. 

Paulina met Ric on set while The Cars were filming the music video for Drive in 1984, and she became his third wife in 1989. They had two sons together, Jonathan, 26, and Oliver, 21. She announced in May 2018 that they had split the previous year after 28 years of marriage. 

Though they were divorcing, they continued to share a New York townhouse and that is where Paulina found the famed rock star dead on the morning of Sunday, September 15. 

Grief: Paulina has also continued to mourn the loss of her estranged husband, The Cars frontman Ric Ocasek, who died in September at the age of 75

Grief: Paulina has also continued to mourn the loss of her estranged husband, The Cars frontman Ric Ocasek, who died in September at the age of 75

Grief: Paulina has also continued to mourn the loss of her estranged husband, The Cars frontman Ric Ocasek, who died in September at the age of 75

Loss: Paulina paid tribute to her late husband on March 23, what would have been his 76th birthday. She shared a message her oldest stepson had written after his father's death

Loss: Paulina paid tribute to her late husband on March 23, what would have been his 76th birthday. She shared a message her oldest stepson had written after his father's death

Loss: Paulina paid tribute to her late husband on March 23, what would have been his 76th birthday. She shared a message her oldest stepson had written after his father’s death 

A medical examiner determined he died from hypertensive and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with pulmonary emphysema being a contributing factor.

Paulina has been candid about her grief on Instagram, and on March 23, she paid tribute to Ric on what would have been his 76th birthday. 

She shared a photo of a post written by Ric’s eldest son, Chris, after his death. Ric has a total of six sons, two from each of his three marriages.

‘When I lived a mile away, he lived a million. What I thought a mere ounce, to him was a billion. But what I learned most from the journey of mine is that “hope” dies a though times,’ the message read. 

‘This post by my oldest stepson, father of my beloved Olivia, wrote this comment after his father’s death,’ she explained. ‘It made me burst out in tears. 

‘Ric was many things, many of them contradictory. Talented. Jealous. Funny. Driven. Judgmental. Passionate. Vain. Silly. Impulsive. Sexy. Vindictive. Generous. Narcissistic. Gentle. So gentle, in fact, that often people confused it with kind. Which he wasn’t. He was never kind. Today is his birthday. 

‘I’m still struggling with comprehending that one can feel two opposing emotions at the same time,’ she admitted. ‘And I still struggle with forgiveness. Still, happy birthday honey, wherever you are. #happybirthdayric #loveneverdies.’ 

Paulina was likely referring to the fact that Ric had cut her out of his will before this death, claiming he was ‘abandoned’ by her. 

The couple was separated when he died, but since they were not legally divorced, she, as his widow, may be entitled under New York law to an ‘elective share’ of his estate.

Ric specifically addressed the rule in his will, stating: ‘Even if I should die before our divorce is final…Paulina is not entitled to any elective share…because she has abandoned me.’

However, unless it can be proven in court that she did abandon him, she will likely be entitled to a one-third share of the musician’s assets, which are listed as $5 million in ‘copyrights’, $100,000 in ‘tangible personal property,’ and $15,000 in cash.

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Why you need to clean your smartwatch NOW: Virologist confirms that COVID-19 can survive on devices https://beautytipsvilla.com/why-you-need-to-clean-your-smartwatch-now-virologist-confirms-that-covid-19-can-survive-on-devices/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-you-need-to-clean-your-smartwatch-now-virologist-confirms-that-covid-19-can-survive-on-devices Fri, 10 Apr 2020 02:03:53 +0000 https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8206811/Why-need-clean-watch-Virologist-confirms-COVID-19-survive-devices.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 An infectious diseases specialist has reminded people to clean their watches and smartwatches to combat coronavirus. Professor Nigel McMillan, from Griffith University, specialises in how viruses are transmitted and told FEMAIL that people need to treat devices as an ‘extension of your hand’.  A recent study found that coronavirus can live […]

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An infectious diseases specialist has reminded people to clean their watches and smartwatches to combat coronavirus.

Professor Nigel McMillan, from Griffith University, specialises in how viruses are transmitted and told FEMAIL that people need to treat devices as an ‘extension of your hand’. 

A recent study found that coronavirus can live on plastic and some stainless steel for up to three days. 

An Infectious Diseases and Immunology specialist has revealed that you need to be very careful around your wrist watch or smartwatch with COVID-19 (stock image)

An Infectious Diseases and Immunology specialist has revealed that you need to be very careful around your wrist watch or smartwatch with COVID-19 (stock image)

An Infectious Diseases and Immunology specialist has revealed that you need to be very careful around your wrist watch or smartwatch with COVID-19 (stock image)

Professor Nigel McMillan (pictured) said that while the virus can live on myriad surfaces, you need to be especially careful with your watch, fitness tracker or smartwatch - which you should see as an 'extension of your hand' during the coronavirus pandemic

Professor Nigel McMillan (pictured) said that while the virus can live on myriad surfaces, you need to be especially careful with your watch, fitness tracker or smartwatch - which you should see as an 'extension of your hand' during the coronavirus pandemic

Professor Nigel McMillan (pictured) said that while the virus can live on myriad surfaces, you need to be especially careful with your watch, fitness tracker or smartwatch – which you should see as an ‘extension of your hand’ during the coronavirus pandemic

‘Every microorganism can live on your watch, whether it’s smart or not,’ Professor McMillan explained.

‘COVID-19 can live on any surface and the more moist it is, the longer it will live there.’

This means that smartwatches in particular – which many people wear to exercise – can be a dangerous home for diseases and infection.

HOW LONG CAN COVID-19 SURVIVE ON SURFACES?

In the air: Infectious disease researchers have found COVID-19 remains infectious in contaminated airborne respiratory droplets for at least three hours, however they have not determined whether humans produce enough of the disease in a single cough or sneeze to infect another person.

On soft, porous surfaces: COVID-19 can survive on porous surfaces like cardboard, paper, clothing and soft furnishings like pillows and Doonas for up to 24 hours. Porous surfaces allow air and water to pass through, which makes them much less likely to hold infectious volumes of the virus compared to non-porous objects like door handles, taps and phone covers.

On hard, shiny surfaces: COVID-19 has been proven to stay active on hard surfaces like glass, plastic and stainless steel for up to 72 hours. Hard, shiny materials are non-porous which means water, air and vapour cannot pass through and instead rest and accumulate on the surface.

World Economic Forum researchers have confirmed the virus does degrade over time, reducing the likelihood of infection the longer contaminated droplets have sat on a surface, but you should still avoid touching handles, buttons and other objects in public spaces. If unavoidable, you should avoid touching your face until you have thoroughly washed your hands with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. 

Frequently touched household surfaces like taps, door handles, computer keyboards and toilets should be cleaned using bleach or alcohol solutions of at least 70 percent alcohol.

On hair: There is no evidence to suggest coronavirus can be carried in strands of beards or facial hair.

Professor McMillan said we should see our watches as an ‘extension of our hands’, and so we should think that every time we touch something, it has probably come into contact with our wrist watches too.

‘Often, people remember to wash their hands, but they don’t give their smartwatches in particular the same level of attention – tapping them to make payments, open notifications and check step counts,’ Professor McMillan said.  

This could lead to you ‘re-infecting’ your hands by touching an unclean device.

'COVID-19 can live on any surface and the more moist it is, the longer it will live there,' Professor McMillan said. You need to wash your smartwatch or tracker often (stock image)

'COVID-19 can live on any surface and the more moist it is, the longer it will live there,' Professor McMillan said. You need to wash your smartwatch or tracker often (stock image)

‘COVID-19 can live on any surface and the more moist it is, the longer it will live there,’ Professor McMillan said. You need to wash your smartwatch or tracker often (stock image)

The best course of action for those who wear a watch, smartwatch or fitness tracker is to wash it or disinfect it regularly with an alcohol wipes.

Apple recommend you turn off your device, remove it from the charger and clean with a non-abrasive, lint-free cloth – which can be dampened with fresh water if needed.

The company dictate that soaps and other cleaning products shouldn’t be used.

Fitbit, meanwhile, say you should clean your fitness tracker using a toothbrush with rubbing alcohol, while Garmin say you should wipe the device using a cloth dampened with a mild detergent solution. 

A recent experiment conducted by ComparemyMobile found smartwatches to be the dirtiest devices we own, with more than 250 bacteria colonies per cm2 (pictured: the bacteria)

A recent experiment conducted by ComparemyMobile found smartwatches to be the dirtiest devices we own, with more than 250 bacteria colonies per cm2 (pictured: the bacteria)

A recent experiment conducted by ComparemyMobile found smartwatches to be the dirtiest devices we own, with more than 250 bacteria colonies per cm2 (pictured: the bacteria)

A recent experiment conducted by ComparemyMobile found smartwatches to be the dirtiest devices, after their experts took swabs of smartphones, keyboards, smartwatches and video game controllers.

While the specialists were not testing for COVID-19, they were testing for three types of bacteria, in particular: coliforms (found in human waste), infection-causing staphylococci and Enterobacteriaceae (a bacterial family that includes the likes of E.Coli and Salmonella). 

Smartwatches were found to be the worst culprits, boasting more than 250 bacteria colonies per cm2, or 3,746 per cent more bacteria than a toilet seat. 

‘Our tests found that smartwatch owners should regularly be cleaning their tech, making sure to clean both the watch face and strap,’ spokesperson for ComparemyMobile Daniel Clifford said.

‘This is especially true if you use your wearable to track your fitness at the gym or when you run as this can cause them to get particularly dirty.’

The CDC's hand washing guide follows WHO's guidelines - which suggest people wash their hands at least five times a day with soap and water or hand sanitizer (pictured)

The CDC's hand washing guide follows WHO's guidelines - which suggest people wash their hands at least five times a day with soap and water or hand sanitizer (pictured)

The CDC’s hand washing guide follows WHO’s guidelines – which suggest people wash their hands at least five times a day with soap and water or hand sanitizer (pictured)

What is the five-step process to perfect hand washing?

  1. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails. 
  3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the ‘Happy Birthday’ song from beginning to end twice. 
  4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water. 
  5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

Source: CDC

Looking after your watch will do little unless you are washing your hands well, however.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is a proper method for washing your hands that will help to stop you and those around you from getting sick.

The agency recommends you wash your hands at frequent intervals to stay healthy, and advises that everyone follow five steps to ensure they are washing their hands the right way.

‘The first step is to wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap,’ the CDC said.

‘Then, lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.’

However the third step is where many people might be falling down.

The CDC recommends you scrub your hands ‘for at least 20 seconds’ – which is the same amount of time it takes to hum Happy Birthday twice.

‘Rinse your hands well under clean running water,’ the guide advises.

Finally, you should use a clean towel to dry your hands or air dry them.

When should you wash your hands?

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food 
  • Before and after caring for someone at home who is sick with vomiting or diarrhea 
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound 
  • After using the toilet 
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet 
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing 
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste 
  • After handling pet food or pet treats 
  • After touching garbage

Source: CDC

Coronavirus essential guide: Your top hygiene questions answered 

Does hand-washing really work?

Yes. A new study published by the highly-respected Cochrane Database which summarises and interprets numerous studies says that handwashing cuts the chances of contracting a respiratory illness such as coronavirus by 54 per cent – the best odds of any deterrent.

So wash your hands – scrubbing every bit of skin from your wrist downwards – at every opportunity for at least 20 seconds (or for however long it takes to sing Happy Birthday in your head twice).

Should I use public transport? 

Only if necessary. If you can work from home rather than commuting, and also minimise shopping trips, you will greatly reduce your infection risk.

One recent study in Nottingham found that people who contracted the flu virus in 2011 were nearly six times more likely than others to have travelled by public transport in the five days before developing symptoms.

 lanes, trains and buses are high-risk environments for easily transmitted viruses – and Covid-19 is particularly infectious – to spread on to our hands via surfaces such as handrails, seats and handles.

If I stay at home will I be safe?

No. Family and friends can easily bring in the virus. To reduce this threat, institute a handwashing rule for everyone as soon as they enter the house.

And make sure there is one hand towel for each person. If that’s not practicable, wash towels frequently.

The post Why you need to clean your smartwatch NOW: Virologist confirms that COVID-19 can survive on devices appeared first on Beauty Tips Villa.

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